Spray Foam FAQs

  • Won’t spray foam insulation seal my house too tight? I have heard that houses should breathe.

    Your house DOES need to be ventilated, BUT most home engineers and building scientists (as well as the US Department of Energy) advise that you seal the structure as tight as possible and provide necessary ventilation through your air conditioning and heating system. Many systems employ an "air exchanger" which pre-conditions incoming outside air to control humidity and energy efficiency. This type of design along with spray foam creates a true Thermal Envelope.
  • Where can spray foam insulation be installed?

    On existing homes, the spray foam insulation can be installed to the attic, roof line, and the rim joists/sill plates to seal in the house.
  • How long does Spray Foam Insulation last?

    Indefinitely. As an inert, long lasting polymer, any residential or commercial structure is a great place for our spray foam insulation.
  • How much does Spray Foam cost?

    The cost of spray foam insulation is dependent upon the type (open or closed cell) as well as the ease of installation, which is effected by factors such as accessibility and size of the spaces to be sprayed. Call 203.297.6337 or complete our contact form to schedule a FREE estimate today.
  • Can spray foam insulation be applied under my house below my wood floors?

    Yes. Applying foam insulation under the wood floors or under subflooring not only creates an air seal and insulates the floor, but it also seals all the cracks and holes where rodents, insects, and spiders enter our homes. The foam will protect your wood floors from soil moisture rising from the ground which can slowly rot your wood. Installing fiberglass batts under your floors can be a problem because they tend to settle, creating an air gap where moisture can penetrate and wreak havoc on your wood, creating a more pleasant environment for insects and rodents.
  • How does Spray Foam Insulation control moisture movement and condensation?

    The most damaging moisture within a building envelope cavity is the result of warm moist inside air being exchanged with the cold dry outside air within the walls. As the moisture in the air condenses, it forms dew within the insulation. Because foam insulation is an air seal, this moisture movement and condensation does not occur. It is ideal for use in climates where buildings are both heated and air conditioned because the situation is reversed in summer with moisture forming on the back of the interior vapor retarder.
  • How does Spray Foam Insulation control indoor air quality and comfort?

    Spray Foam Insulation provides a sealed thermal envelope. The insulation fills each cavity and void when applied. It contributes to the overall comfort and health of the occupants of a home because there are no loose fibers to move about. By reducing air infiltration, the insulation also reduces dust and harmful household mold and mildew. Spray Foam Insulation provides a healthier, draft-free environment with no harmful emissions that can cause allergic reactions.
  • How is Spray Foam insulation installed?

    Spray Foam insulation is sprayed into place by a trained Good Life professional. As with any open surface, the foam insulation can be sprayed after electrical and plumbing services are in place. It can be sprayed in attics, walls, basements, and crawl spaces to greatly reduce air infiltration and provide a more energy efficient dwelling.
  • How does Spray Foam compare with cellulose?

    Blown-in cellulose has an R-value of about 3 to 4 (1-inch thickness) but has no air seal. Blown-in cellulose will slow down air leakage, but can settle over time, leaving some sections uninsulated. Spray foam completely adheres to wood and sheathing; the result is a permanent barrier to heat loss and air entry. Open Cell Spray foam has a true R-value of about 4.0 per inch and Closed Cell has an R-value over 6 per inch. Spray foam completely adheres to wood and sheathing; the result is a permanent barrier to heat loss and air entry. In addition, spray foam will add strength to the structure where cellulose will not.
  • How does Spray Foam compare with fiberglass batts?

    Fiberglass batts will not stop air leakage. Spray foam will stop air leakage dead. Spray foam is also mold and moisture resistant unlike fiberglass. Fiberglass batts have an R-value of about 3.5 (1-inch thickness) but this is not a “true” R-value since there is no air seal. Open Cell Spray foam has a true R-value of about 4.0 per inch and Closed Cell has an R-value over 6 per inch. Fiberglass batts can sag over time and can leave gaps and small sections uninsulated. Spray foam completely adheres to wood and sheathing; the result is a permanent barrier to heat loss and air entry. In addition, spray foam will add strength to the structure where fiberglass batts will not.
  • Which is better, Open Cell or Closed Cell Spray Foam?

    There are costs and benefits to both types of polyurethane foams. We can recommend the best one for your home during the free consultation, answering any questions you may have. You can read about some of the differences between Open and Closed cell here.
  • What are the benefits of Spray Foam Insulation?

    • Stops air and moisture infiltration to seal your home to greatly reduce energy costs
    • Adds strength to the building structure
    • Makes your home more comfortable
    • Reduces dust and harmful household mold and mildew
    • Reduces capacity requirements, maintenance and wear of HVAC equipment

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